SIMEDHealth

American Heart Month with Dr. Jenny Chen

Did you know 1 in 3 deaths are caused by cardiovascular disease every year in the United States? February is American Heart Month and aims to shed light on the dangers of cardiovascular diseases. We sat down with SIMEDHealth's Primary Care Physician Jenny Chen, MD, to discuss the most prevalent of the heart diseases, coronary artery disease.

1. What is Coronary Artery Disease?

"Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease and is caused by atherosclerosis plaque building up inside the heart arteries (coronary arteries). The plaque is composed of cholesterol, fatty deposits, and other material on the inner walls of the arteries", explains Dr. Chen. "These inner artery wall deposits result in narrowing or potential obstruction of the space for the flow of blood."

"A heart attack occurs when a coronary artery supplying your heart muscle is blocked, leading to loss of blood flow and oxygen to the muscle cells. If the blockage lasts too long, that part of your heart muscle dies." 

2. What are the factors that could lead to CAD?

Dr. Chen says, "Many factors can contribute to coronary artery disease. These risk factors include but are not limited to high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, obesity, family history/genetics, and aging."

3. What are some ways to prevent CAD?

"There are many ways to prevent or slow the progression of CAD," says Dr. Chen. "If you are a smoker, there is nothing more important in preventing the progression of CAD than stopping smoking. For those with diabetes, its very important to keep glucose under control through diet, exercise, and possibly medication. Eating a healthy diet, including numerous fruits and vegetables per day, minimizing trans-fat, saturated fat, and refined carbohydrates, can all help prevent developing CAD. Also, keeping one's blood pressure well-controlled can help reduce the risk. This means periodically monitoring one's blood pressure and following doctors' instructions on diet, and taking the correct medications if needed. Cardiovascular exercise, if one is healthy enough to do so, can also reduce the risk of CAD. The goal is at least 10 min per session and at least a combined 150 minutes per week of aerobic activity."

4. What are the symptoms of a heart attack in men and women? Why are some of the symptoms different in women?

"Classic symptoms of a heart attack which both men and women can experience include chest pain, an aching sensation in your chest or left arm that may spread to your neck or jaw. Patients can also experience sweating, shortness of breath, palpitations, severe fatigue, nausea, upset stomach, or abdominal pain," says Dr. Chen.

She also adds, "Women are more likely than men to report non-classic symptoms of a heart attack. For example, a woman having a heart attack may complain only of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal discomfort rather than chest pain."

5. What else can I do?

A visit with your primary care physician can help you identify the CAD risk factors that may apply to you. If not done recently, lab testing can be done to evaluate your cholesterol and glucose. Together you can then develop a plan to lower your CAD risks over time. By taking control of the risk factors, you can do a lot to prevent your chances of developing heart disease. 

 

Click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Chen or one of our other Primary Care physicians and nurse practitioners. 

What You Need to Know About Donating Blood

Did you know a single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood? January is National Blood Donor Month, and to spread awareness, we talked to Jenny Chen, MD of SIMEDHealth Primary Care in Ocala. We discussed the benefits and the process of donating.

 

1. Why is it important to give blood?

"Blood donation is essential for saving lives!" explains Dr. Chen. "Having stored blood available is necessary for surgeries, cancer treatment, certain blood disorders, and traumatic injuries. Benefits for donors include a free medical check-up satisfaction of helping others, and free cookies, juice, and sometimes promotional items."

 

2. What are the requirements to give blood?

  • According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, donors are eligible to donate no sooner than 56 days (eight weeks) after their previous donation. However, not all donors qualify at this minimum interval, as it depends upon how rapidly the person's body can replenish its red blood cells.
  •  You must be in good health and feeling well
  • You must be at least 16 or 17 years old in most states
  • You must weigh at least 110 lbs

3. How long does the donation process last?

Dr. Chen says, "The entire process takes about 1 hour and 15 minutes, but the actual blood donation takes 8 to 10 minutes. However, the time varies slightly with each person depending on several factors, including the donor's health history." 

During the donation, a needle is put into a vein in the upper extremity. This is done by skilled medical personnel in such a way to minimize possible symptoms such as lightheadedness. One pint of blood is withdrawn, approximately 500 mL, which is equivalent to one "unit". The donor is monitored during the donation and for a few minutes afterward. Juice and snacks are provided to help decrease post-donation symptoms.

 

4. Are there any side effects of donating blood?

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, 1.2% of donors suffered from an adverse reaction. Dr. Chen assures, "The vast majority had mild reactions such as agitation, sweating, pallor, cold feeling, sense of weakness, nausea. Only 0.2% had more severe disorders, including vomiting, loss of consciousness, and fainting."

"It is important to note that, donating removes iron from the body, and can result in a temporary iron deficiency if the lost iron is not replaced," explains Dr. Chen. "The risk of iron deficiency is highest in teenage donors, menstruating women, and individuals who donate frequently." For some, just eating iron-rich foods is not sufficient to replenish lost iron. Many donation organizations recommend taking an iron supplement or a multivitamin for 60 days to replace the iron lost through each donation.

 

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Chen or one of our other SIMEDHealth Primary Care physicians today!